Star Wars, Star Wars: Rebels, Stormtrooper, The Emperor's Inquisitor

Star Wars: Rebels Character and Setting Details from Dave Filoni

Star Wars Rebels

Dave Filoni, the mastermind behind Star Wars Clone Wars and the upcoming Star Wars: Rebels television shows has revealed a bit more about characters and setting in a recent interview.  It looks like a lot of the inspiration for design and for settings and plot are being drawn from the classic Ralph McQuarrie drawings that so defined the first Star Wars film.  I love everything I read about this series and I’m looking forward to seeing it premiere later this year.Speaking with MoviePilot.de, Filoni says the series will see the return of classic Star Wars ships and how it differs from his previous work on “The Clone Wars.”

“We will see many things that are famous to Star Wars, but have not appeared on-screen in a while. Star Destroyers, TIE Fighters, and Stormtroopers – basically the Empire is back and that is a big change, since, for many years, we have only seen the Republic in action. The tone of the series is also different. The Clone Wars got very dark as we headed towards the end of the war and the downfall of the Jedi. Star Wars Rebels brings back the banter and faster pace that the original films were famous for.”

Filoni also spoke about the setting for the series, the new planet of Lothal.

“Rebels takes place in the Outer Rim. The audience typically thinks of Tatooine as the place where Luke Skywalker grew up, when the Outer Rim is mentioned. We are on a more civilized planet, and one that profited from the Empire’s existence in the beginning. Most of the stories take place on the planet Lothal, which is a grass planet with large monolithic stones on the surface. The look comes from some Ralph McQuarrie concept paintings that were done for the original Star Wars films. We tried to make Lothal look and feel like a planet that would have been in the original film trilogy. It’s alien, but you feel like it’s someplace that you could visit on Earth geographically. Hoth, Tatooine, and Endor are all like this, so we think it fits in well.”

So far the only confirmed character for the series is the newly-created villain “The Inquisitor,” but now Filoni has revealed another character for the series, a droid named Chopper. You can check out the video below to learn more about “Star Wars Rebels'” Chopper (PICTURED ABOVE).

Set between the events of “Episode III” and “IV,” “Star Wars Rebels” will be produced by Lucasfilm Animation, featuring many of the key talents that made “Star Wars: The Clone Wars.” It is scheduled to premiere in fall 2014 as a one-hour special telecast on Disney Channel, and will be followed by a series on Disney XD channels around the world.
Star Wars Rebels

16 thoughts on “Star Wars: Rebels Character and Setting Details from Dave Filoni”

  1. Using McQuarrie’s art is such an unexpected move. But I wish they would take it a step further. I wish that they would use McQuarrie’s concept art even with the established characters… Vader and Threepio, ect. McQuarrie’s art was superior to what ended up on screen… even Lucas laments it. Yes, what I am suggesting would violate continuity, but couldn’t it just be chalked up to artistic license?

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    1. I don’t think after 30 years you could make that radical a departure from the established characters. I think the most that they can do with it is use it to the extent they already are. I get where you’re coming from, but I think it would alienate more people than it would please those who would see it for the love letter to the roots of the franchise it is.

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      1. On reflection, you are, of course, right. Only the fanatics like us would understand. But what I’m seeing here is impressive. The Inquisitor looks downright iconic, and the idea of putting a new astromech driod front and center would never have occurred to me. R2-D2 is such a memorable character… he has virtually nothing in common with a human being, and yet his very distinct personality shines through. If Chopper is just as clear and distinct, he’ll be a wonderful addition. My main problem with the Expanded Universe was always that, save for Mara Jade and Admiral Thrawn, it failed to generate the kind of iconic, archetypal characters that populate the movies. Now that Disney is exercising some quality control over the spinoffs, things could change.

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      2. I think they absolultely will and I’m freaking getting rabid about Rebels. This looks incredible and the possibilities are completely endless. Not to mention, if the Inquisitor takes off there’s no reason he wouldn’t show up one day in a live-action film. More droid characters are also fabulous ideas. I think that they’re doing these little things that pay homage to the long-time fans and mean nothing to anyone but us, shows Disney wants everyone back onboard. They’re taking the refreshing attitude of instead of “why go to the trouble to do these little things?” they’re saying, “why NOT do these little things that matter to the people who are going to spend the most money on on our franchise?” This renaissance is going to bankrupt me and Lego Star Wars sets alone….let’s just say all the cheap ones are mine and my wife had to throw herself between me and a LEGO Death Star.

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      3. This makes me even more convinced that the Prequels’ reputation will improve in time, even amongst the fans who hate it. My reasoning is thus. Right now, the Prequels represent half of the Star Wars saga. And if you don’t like them, that has to be rough. But now, in addition to the Sequels and the one-off movies, Disney is getting its Expanded Universe act together. Where, in the past, the spinoffs were basically Lucasfilm-approved fan fiction, they will now begin to actually matter. Very soon, between the movies and the reorganized Expanded Universe, the Prequels are going start to take up a far smaller percentage of the overall SW universe, and that means they will be a LOT more tolerable to the dissenters.

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      4. I think that’s sound logic. Look at Star Trek. People don’t spend half of Star Trek message boards talking about how stupid Star Trek V was. There’s a much larger body of work.

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      5. The problem with Star Trek is that the body of work is TOO large. There’s the odd number curse with the movies, and I think most Trek fans would probably prefer for Voyager and Enterprise never to have happened. And those were entire television series. But those were different times, franchise-building was not what it is, and I don’t think Disney will allow SW to turn into ST.

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      6. In terms of movies, I think it will be bigger. There are 12 Treks (btw, I think 11 broke the odd number curse pretty firmly) and the seventh Star Wars is in production. We know there’s one more Trek coming and then massive uncertainty looms. Star Wars is going to start cranking out a movie a year starting next year. Star Wars will pass Trek at that rate in 2022 or 2023. The second show is about to begin; who knows if a live-action show would ever happen. I think, and it will take a long time, that the two will have comprable bodies of work. That doesn’t mean the Star Wars stuff will suck. Trek was at one time golden on TV, but they lost control of the franchise. As long as Disney carefully manages their property, I don’t care how big the body of work eventually gets. There are so many potential stories to tell that with careful management, Star Wars could eventually have a bigger body of work (and remember, Trek did have a 17 year head start).

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      7. As long as there is quality control, I’m all for lots and lots of new SW. The environment that gave birth to The Final Frontier has passed. Also, Star Trek has always been very formulaic, while Star Wars can encompass a LOT of different kinds of stories. Lucas drew on Westerns and gangster movies and Kurosawa films and film noirs and Arthurian legends, and even Shakespearian tragedies. If these new films are launched properly, Disney will have even more of a playground than the one the Marvel universe affords. Abrams just needs to get the first one right. That’s it. Just one really cool Star Wars movie. With great power comes great responsibility.

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      8. There, you hit on it, Marvel’s a much better analogy for Star Wars because there are already more Marvel movies than Star Wars and the diversity of how those films are told is how we’re hoping the Star Wars films are treated. Marvel has TV shows both live and animated. I think the Marvel model (and I’ve heard this from Disney execs) is the one they’re hoping to follow. I have no problem with that because the quality control and respect to fans has been stellar.

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      9. The wild card is Abrams. I ought to have unconditional faith in him; with Star Trek and Super 8, he proved that he could successfully channel other filmmakers and their worlds. But at the same time, I get the sense that he’s used to doing things his way. Hopefully his love for SW will cause him to only consider what’s best for SW, but the worst case scenario is that he takes the opportunity to put his own stamp on SW, and it gets wacky. While I’m no longer as concerned as I was that he convinced everyone to change the focus of Episode 7, I’m aware that the new direction is fraught with peril. Honestly Brad Bird would have been the best choice to direct this… Brad Bird does not really have a style yet, unless awesomeness by itself is a style. But it is what it is. May the Force be with everyone involved, and I really mean it with all my heart.

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      10. We both know Bird’s doing one of these. If Disney hadn’t ensnared him in Tomorrowland he’d probably be doing this one, but Abrams is a a good starter. It’s what he does. He starts and he leaves. It’s what he’s done with all his shows and all his films have had to work with in an established framework. Super 8 is a Spielberg film. He put that framework on himself even when he didn’t have to. Mission Impossible III and Star Trek both had franchise constraints and histories and more importantly, both were coming off of AWFUL installments and he reignited the fire in both of those. This is what he does.

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      11. Super 8 is enchanting. It took me back to my childhood. It made me remember what a good period it was to grow up in when it came to movies. My father and I bonded over Speilberg movies and Lucas movies and Zemekis movies and all the imitations, good and bad. Now that I’m older I know that The Last Starfighter is a special kind of awful, but when I was a kid I sat there for two hours with my jaw hanging open. The special effects in the 80’s were clunkier, but there was a sense of wonder in the air because of those old movies. And Abrams brought all those amazing memories flooding back to me. He captured a very specific cinematic era, and he did it beautifully.

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      12. I have issues with Super 8, but he made such a dead-on Spielberg film that they’re issues I have with Spielberg not Abrams. It’s a unique film in that I don’t know that a director has ever set out to make a film wholly in the style of another director.

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