Tag Archives: Pulp Fiction

Samuel L. Jackson’s 10 Best Movies

Samuel L. Jackson

Samuel L. Jackson, like fellow actors Morgan Freeman and Tommy Lee Jones, came late to superstardom.  Jackson was in his mid-40s when his career began to skyrocket with roles in Jurassic Park and his first of six partnerships with Quentin Tarantino in Pulp Fiction.  Despite the late start, Jackson quickly became known as one of the hardest working actors in Hollywood.  His filmography has over 100 movies on it as Jackson continues to make several film appearances every year.  A huge comic book fan himself, Jackson’s Nick Fury was the backbone of the early MCU.  His Nick Fury was so popular that the character in the comics was redesigned to bear his likeness.  His plus-sized personality and range continue to grow (practice, if nothing else, makes perfect) and heading into his 70s, Jackson is as big a star as he ever was.
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Top 10: Best Movie Dialogue of All-Time

We haven’t had a CineFix list in a while; my favorite place for YouTube movie lists.  As a “word person” myself, I firmly believe the best films begin with the best scripts.  Most of the best scripts rest on the back of great dialogue.  CineFix has put together their 10 Best Dialogue Movies of All-Time.  The thing that makes CineFix’s lists so intriguing is that they’re not straight top 10 lists.  Each rung on their ladder represents a specific aspect of the topic they’re tackling, and unlike some sites, they have a long memory for film and do a great job of comparing classic cinema with recent releases.  For example the ten spots in the Best Dialogue of All-Time represent: evoking a place or time, wordplay, subtext, verbal conflict, storytelling, realism, hyper stylized, Non-American English dialogue, banter, and Shakespearean.  As usual, I probably would have picked one of their honorable mentions for several spots, and instead of highlighting Kenneth Lonergan as the “up and coming” voice in screenwriting, I’d have highlighted Taylor Sheridan (Wind River, Hell or High Water).  It’s still interesting and educational, as always.

Kenneth Branagh in Hamlet

Top 10: Movie Props of All-Time

CineFix lists are a staple now on Killing Time.  I love the way they continually crank out amazing lists exploring the breadth of the history of cinema, and how each rung on the ladder is a different aspect of the subject they’re examining.  Here, we’re talking props.  Iconic movie items.  The lightsaber.  Indy’s bullwhip. Inception’s top (an honorable mention on their list but I would have definitely put it up there.  Props even become characters.  Their selection, and I can’t argue, Wilson from Cast Away.  Tom Hanks got me to cry when a volleyball floated away.  Every time.  Because HE WAS WILSON!!!  Inanimate objects are tools of the actors and take on lives of their own.  They’re an integral part of film and this was a fantastic idea for a list.  Bravo to my favorite channel on YouTube.

Harrison Ford in Raiders of the Lost Ark

Top 5: Scenes from Pulp Fiction

Uma Thurman, John Travolta, Pulp Fiction

 

We started this last year and then got a bit off-track, but I’d like to pick up our monthly examination of the Top 250 films on IMDB.  To review, so far we’ve looked at:
1. Shawshank Redemption
2. The Godfather
3. The Godfather Part 2
4. The Dark Knight

Which brings us to #5: Pulp Fiction.  Now, the first four films in the IMDB 250, I revere.  I, quite frankly, don’t think Pulp Fiction is even the fifth best film from 1994, let alone of all-time.  I think it’s incredibly overrated.  To me, it’s a good film that showed the promise Tarantino would fulfill later with Inglorious Bastards, but not the apex of his career.  I think the film has a great beginning and a great end, but the 90 minutes inbetween are largely forgettable (or memorable only for being REALLY disturbing).  I think the writing is lazy.  Scripts that drop the F-bomb every other word bore me.  I don’t hate the film.  Whenever we’re with Jules and Vincent, I fricking love it, but again that’s pretty much the first half-hour and last half-hour.  I know this is a Holy Grail movie to some people, so I’m going to stop my criticism and single out my favorite scenes .  It goes without saying (yet I’m still going to warn) that there is an extreme violence and potty mouth warning on this column.

1. Ezekiel 25:17

Easily the movie’s best scene is Samuel L. Jackson’s hamburger tasting/Bible quoting show of force.  This six minutes is worth watching the whole movie.  Whatever issues I have with the film as a whole, I could watch this piece a million times and never get bored.

2. Poor Marvin

How big are the squibs Tarantino uses?  I have to think they’re like nine times the size of a normal squib.  The shoot-out in Django Unchained is like people are sacks of raspberry jam bulging at the seams.  This is a shocker the first time you see it and darkly hilarious in subsequent watchings.  Poor Marvin, really.

3.  Divine Intervention

Jump to the end of the film when Jules and Vincent get stuck in volleyball clothes following Marvin’s…explosion.  Jules ponders the meaning behind their survival and concludes it was a case of Divine Intervention.

4. The Gold Watch

This is how good Christopher Walken is.  He has, literally, one scene in the entire film and it’s a monologue about how he’s kept a watch up his butt for years and it is MESMERIZING.  Definitely a case of tell being better than show.  If only that could’ve held true in the pawn shop basement….yeesh.

5.  Royale With Cheese

Probably the two most iconic scenes from the film are this one and the dance contest, likely because they’re the easiest scenes in the film to edit for broadcast television.  Your introduction to Jules and Vincent, the scene is memorable for a reason even if it’s been repeated and mocked to death.

Top 10 Movies You Have to Watch Twice *SPOILER WARNING*

Another great video put together by the stellar team at WatchMojo.com examines the phenomenon of the movie that immediately demands a second viewing.  You know what I’m talking about.  You think you like it.  You’re pretty sure it’s brilliant…but you have no way of knowing for sure until you go back and double-check a few things to see that everything connects.  We’re talking Memento (mainly because it takes a minimum of two viewings to wrap your brain around that film) not The LEGO Movie, which demands a second viewing because of everything being awesome.  What do you think of WM’s list?  What would you have included?  Hit up the comments section and let’s get a dialogue going about the films that baked our brains.