Category Archives: Music

Bohemian Rhapsody Trailer #1 (2018) “The Only Thing More Extraordinary Than Their Music is His Story”

Mr. Robot actor Rami Malek channels late Queen singer Freddie Mercury’s witty side in the first trailer for Bohemian Rhapsody, the long-awaited Queen biopic.

The movie traverses Queen’s rise from the 1970s through their triumphant set at 1985’s Live Aid, six years before Mercury died of complications from AIDS. The new trailer features concert scenes interspersed with the group cutting songs in the studio. It also features a mash-up of several Queen classics, including “Killer Queen,” “We Will Rock You” and the film’s namesake.

“This is when the operatic section comes,” a wide-eyed Malek as Mercury explains as he helms the studio board during a recording session for “Bohemian Rhapsody.” Later, when the band is told that the song is too long (“It goes on forever; six bloody minutes”), Mercury quips, “I pity your wife if you think six minutes is forever.”

Bohemian Rhapsody arrives in theaters on November 2nd. The biopic also stars Lucy Boynton, Gwilym Lee (as Brian May), Ben Hardy (as Roger Taylor), Joseph Mazzello (as John Deacon), Aiden Gillen, Tom Hollander and Mike Meyers.
*Text from Rolling Stone

Rami Malek in Bohemian Rhapsody

My Favorite Scene: Amadeus (1984) “The Patron Saint of Mediocrity”

We recently lost a great director in Milos Forman and, while he left an impressive list of works, nothing approaches his accomplishment in Amadeus.  The biopic of Mozart is a showcase for two things: Mozart’s music and the role F. Murray Abraham was born to play: Mozart’s composing rival Salieri.  Some actors only get to be iconic in one role.  That’s the case with Abraham, who has gone on to do some fine character work, but nothing that touches Salieri.  The only thing worse than being bad at something is being very good at what you were born to do and sitting in the shadow of a legend.  The high points of Amadeus are the scenes between a feeble, mad Salieri in an asylum conversing with a priest.  They serve to connect the audience to the ongoing narrative of Mozart’s short life, and they become increasingly more menacing and unhinged as Salieri rails against God for turning his back on him and making Mozart his messenger through music.  The composer gone mad ends the film absolving the other inmates having dubbed himself “The Patron Saint of Mediocrity”.

Serenade for Winds in B-Flat Major is my favorite piece of Mozart’s and the one Salieri chooses to try to explain what made Mozart’s music so transcendent.  Hundreds of years since his passing, and Mozart is still the greatest composer of all-time.  Even if you don’t think you know Mozart’s music, by the end of the film you realize how much you actually do and how much it still serves as the soundtrack of the human race.  Salieri lived long enough to see his own works forgotten.  Amadeus resembles its subject in 100 years from now, people will still watch this film in wonder and delight, both because of the music that inspired it and the brilliant film craft that wove an epic biography around it.

Movie Review: The Greatest Showman (2017) *Not the Greatest But Pretty Darn Good*

Hugh Jackman as P.T. Barnum in The Greatest Showman
You know there’s been a massive shift in the way Hollywood views musicals when a blockbuster Christmas release is marketed on the back of lyricists.  The Greatest Showman, Hugh Jackman’s first film post-Wolverine, is a musical “biopic” of circus pioneer and American showman P.T. Barnum.  It’s songs are brought to you by the team of lyricists that worked with composer Justin Hurwitz to make La La Land’s magic last year.  The Greatest Showman is, by no means, another La La Land.  That film was one of strongest films in every aspect of the last few years.  The Greatest Showman can be heavy-handed and overly earnest, but it’s well-meaning and charming and-in the end-your opinion of the film probably will rise or fall with how much you like those songs touted on the movie’s poster.   Continue reading Movie Review: The Greatest Showman (2017) *Not the Greatest But Pretty Darn Good*

My Favorite Scene: La La Land (2016) “Epilogue – The Price of Dreams”

The REAL best picture from last year still has me kind of puzzled as to how a classical Hollywood musical managed to completely blow me away to the point where I ended up seeing it more in the the theater than I did Rogue One.  Damien Chazelle is come kind of mad wunderkind.  Whiplash was a work of genius, and La La Land is also about music and extols the virtue of jazz, but this couldn’t be more different.  An unabashed musical of this sort hadn’t been made since the late 1950s.  It’s charming, visually stunning, has amazing music and songs, and finishes in a surprisingly bittersweet, though charming look at what might have been for the film’s stars: Mia (Emma Stone) and Sebastian (Ryan Gosling).

Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone in La La Land

La La Land is about chasing your dreams, and-ultimately-if you take away a message from the film it’s that you can have your dreams and the person you love the most, but be wary, because the smallest decision, one alteration from what you know in your heart to be the right course, and you’ll end up losing one or the other (or likely both outside of the world of movies).  The film’s end flashes forward five years.  Mia’s achieved her dream of acting success and Sebastian has his jazz club, which Mia and her husband stumble into one night one the way home.  Sebastian, playing the piano, sees Mia, and begins to play their theme, and then Chazelle takes the audience on a trip through an alternate timeline, where things didn’t go wrong between them, and they still got what they wanted.  We revisit the music and locales of the film and the entire thing shouldn’t work because we’re too jaded in 2017 for something as hokey as this amazingly shot dance number…but apparently we’re not if it’s done right.  This is a perfect film, period.
Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone in La La Land

POLL Results: The KT Community’s Best Film of 2016 is…….

Felicity Jones, Jyn Erso, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,

After a month of frenzied voting, the leader never changed, and the Killing TIme Community has officially selected Rogue One: A Star Wars Story as their Best Film of 2016.  Of the 15 possible nominees, 12 received votes, showing the depth of quality movies from last year.  This marks the second consecutive year that a Star Wars film has won the top community prize, giving Disney a perfect record since they took over the franchise (I wouldn’t count out The Last Jedi taking 2017). Continue reading POLL Results: The KT Community’s Best Film of 2016 is…….