Matthew McConaughey

Matthew McConaughey’s 10 Best Movies

Matthew McConaughey

Matthew McConaughey has had two phases to his career.  Bursting on the scene with 1996’s A Time to Kill, he seemed like the next superstar, but battles with substance abuse and a chronic lack of focus (probably not unconnected) left him nearly written off.  However in the last decade McConaughey has climbed back into the top rungs of leading men, culminating in his Oscar for The Dallas Buyers Club and his astonishing performance in HBO’s True Detective’s first season (which would have won him an Emmy any other year than Bryan Cranston’s last on Breaking Bad).  Since, he has kept up a steady stream of successes, and is always someone to pay attention to now in whatever projects he chooses to pursue.Matthew McConaughey in True Detective Season One
Matthew McConaughey’s Best 10
1. True Detective Season One (2014-HBO) Det. Rust Cohle
2. A Time to Kill (1996) Jake Brigance
3. Tropic Thunder (2008) Rick Peck
4. Interstellar (2014) Cooper
5. Dallas Buyer’s Club (2013) Ron Woodroof
6. Amistad (1997) Roger Sherman Baldwin
7. The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) Mark Hanna
8. Contact (1997) Palmer Joss
9. Sing (2016) Buster Moon
10. The Lincoln Lawyer (2011) Mick Haller
Honorable Mention: Mud (2012) Mud

Matthew McConaughey in A Time to Kill

Oscars, Golden Globes & Emmys

Oscar Wins (1): Dallas Buyers Club (2014)

Oscar Nominations (1): Dallas Buyers Club (2014)

Matthew McConaughey in The Dallas Buyers Club

Golden Globe Wins (0): None

Golden Globe Nominations (2)Dallas Buyers Club (2014), True Detective (2015)

Matthew McConaughey in Interstellar

Emmy Wins (0): None

Emmy Nominations (2): True Detective (Actor & Producer)

Leonardo DiCaprio and Matthew McConaughey in The Wolf of Wall Street

My Favorite McConaughey Scene:
“Jake’s Closing Argument” from A Time to Kill (1996)

Next Film: McConaughey is working on three films for 2018: the crime drama White Boy Rick, Serenity with Anne Hathaway, and the comedy Beach Bum.
Anne Hathaway and Matthew McConaughey in Serenity

26 thoughts on “Matthew McConaughey’s 10 Best Movies”

    1. Thank you good sir, I clearly need to watch Killer Joe and Fraility, but these lists are ever changing. They’re updated every time someone who has a list in the archives releases a film or I watch an old film of theirs so they’re ever-changing…..which as I do more and more of them is becoming quite a feat lol

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’ve gotten to see a lot of great films from the suggestions I get after the first “draft” goes up. I think this is about the 30th of these I’ve done. I try to alternate between actor/actress unless someone has passed that week (ex. Bill Paxton, Sam Shepard, John Hurt) in which case I do their career review instead of an obit, which I find really depressing to write. I’m thinking Kathy Bates may be next week. I usually try to tie it to a recent release….but this is August so I’m pretty much on my own here lol.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Sigh, I’m still doing Bates, I don’t have a good enough handle on Lewis’ entire body of work to do him justice, and a fair amount of it defies list entries; he was a comedic force in his heyday.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. LEO! You know I have not seen it and that and Killer Joe clearly are being requested, so I will try to make it a point to watch both soon, but as you know, these are updated every time anyone in the archive releases a film or I watch an old film of theirs that I think cracks their top 10, so they are living (high maintenance lol) lists!

      Like

  1. Cool list. Question: Are you placing more weight on MM’s individual performance or the overall quality of the film? If it’s based on the film as a whole, I’d personally drop Dallas Buyers Club and Sing out of the top 10 and replace them with Mud and Magic Mike. In any event, I’d drop Sing out as his performance in Magic Mike is amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I base it on the film as a whole. I have not actually seen Magic Mike as it never really appealed to me, but I thought DBC was a really strong film, but the fun of lists is debating them, clearly from the other comments I need to watch Killing Joe and Fraility which I also have not (thise lists are always subject to revision!) thanks for commenting!

      Like

  2. Contact is a wonderful kind-of unsung film that is seriously flawed because of Matthew’s role in it. Weird performance, and a character that you could have lifted right out of the movie, and it would have made no difference. When there was a joke about it on Family Guy, I felt vindicated. In fact, I was not a fan of his first phase at all. His big breakout role could have been played by anyone and his Amistad performance was stagey and hyper-mannered.

    But the second phase of his career… the second phase… let’s just say that something has obviously come over him, because he is incredibly talented and off the chart charismatic.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. He’s certainly much stronger as McConaughey 2.0, but I still think A Time to Kill is incredibly compelling, and-with The Firm and The Rainmaker-likely the only good Grisham adaptations we’ll ever get given Grisham’s opinion of selling the movie rights to his stuff after some of the crap that was adapted afterward.

      Like

    1. I think A Time to Kill is still a powerful film. It and Runaway Jury are the only Grisham novels to film that have impressed me. The Firm was ok. But they stopped impressing him too which is why he stopped selling the rights a loooong time ago and he makes such ungodly money off the books he could care less if Hollywood doesn’t get them.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s