Category Archives: Their 10 Best

Rachel McAdams’s 10 Best Movies

Rachel McAdams

Rachel McAdams will probably spend the rest of her career trying to shed The Notebook, but she’s doing a pretty good job.  The film that made her a star also gave her a slight reputation as a serious actress; the kind the gets consigned to rom coms for the rest of their career (Meg Ryan Syndrome).  McAdams has bucked hard against that preconception of her, turning in excellent dramatic work in State of Play, True Detective, and her Oscar-nominated turn in Spotlight.  She’s a gifted comedienne and extremely likable in films like Game Night and Morning Glory.  Those dual gifts are on full display i my favorite film of her’s (Spotlight is better, but you don’t really watch it on a lark): the very underrated About Time.  She’s also joined Doctor Strange’s corner of the MCU and Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes franchises in recurring roles. Continue reading Rachel McAdams’s 10 Best Movies

Jason Bateman’s 10 Best Movies

Jason Bateman

Jason Bateman has had more success at making a career out of being hilariously deadpan since anyone since Bob Newhart.  Bateman was a child star, first appearing way back in 1981 in Little House in the Prairie before, more famously, in Silver Spoons from 1982-1984, and in Valerie from 1986-1991, growing up on the small screen.  Bateman was a journeyman, but quality TV actor until the cult-turned-mainstream success of the wonderfully subversive Arrested Development made him a huge star and also made him in-demand for film roles as well.  He’s had some great comedies, most lately the awesome Game Night, as well as surprising by showing dramatic range in films like Juno, Up in the Air, and The Gift.  As his career nears 40 years already, Bateman has become extremely good at picking projects that showcase his type of laconic humor and expect him to continue to be a fixture on TV and film as long as he wants to act. Continue reading Jason Bateman’s 10 Best Movies

Emma Stone’s 10 Best Movies

Emma Stone

Emma Stone broke into films using her wit and comedic timing in films like Superbad, Zombieland and Easy A.  As she’s matured (and she’ll only turn 30 this year), Stone has shown she also has dramatic chops (The Help), the ability to do deep character work (Battle of the Sexes), and a talent for song and dance that won her an Oscar for La La Land.  Stone doesn’t work as much as other actresses of her generation, but following her Oscar success she is now the highest-paid actress in Hollywood and whatever projects lie in her future she has an almost unmatched power for someone her age in picking and choosing the films that will fill out her career’s filmography. Continue reading Emma Stone’s 10 Best Movies

Martin Freeman’s 10 Best Movies

Martin Freeman

Martin Freeman looks like an accountant more than he does a major star, but Freeman’s star has catapulted from the early days of the BBC’s version of The Office to roles in the biggest films Hollywood has to offer.  Freeman has always bounced back and forth between television and films.  He redefined Dr. Watson for a new generation in Sherlock, starred in a better Fargo than the film, and began The Office revolution.  He’s also traversed Middle-Earth, traveled the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and starred in a trilogy of Edgar Wright’s most bizarre comedies.  He has astounding range for someone who looks like a midwestern insurance salesman (he just changed careers from accountancy), and while is terrifically funny, can be menacing, charming, or heart-breaking in turns.  Anything that has Martin Freeman in it is instantly worth watching, because if it’s good, he’s going to make it great, and even if it’s bad; he’ll make it tolerable. Continue reading Martin Freeman’s 10 Best Movies

John Mahoney’s 10 Best Movies

John Mahoney

John Mahoney passed away this week from cancer at the age of 77. Originally born in the UK, Mahoney earned his US citizenship serving in the armed forces. A veteran of the stage his entire acting career, Mahoney was one of film’s best character actors in the 1980s and 1990s in films like Say Anything, In the Line of Fire, and The American President before transitioning to television. His career-defining role was in the most successful spin-off in television history, Frasier, playing the cranky father of fussy psychiatrist Dr. Frasier Crane for 11 seasons. Mahoney spent most of the rest of his career as a high-caliber addition to limited series and guest starring in shows while splitting time returning to his roots onstage. His legacy as one of television’s most beloved and memorable fathers is perhaps best summed up by the reaction to his death by actor Kelsey Grammer, who played his son for over a decade. “He was my father,” Grammer said. “I loved him.”

Continue reading John Mahoney’s 10 Best Movies