Tag Archives: IMDB Top 250

Top 5: Scenes from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (IMDB Top 250 #11)

Lord of the RIngs

Every month (or so…..I swear they’re coming more regularly) we take a look at a movie on the Internet Movie Database’s List of the TOP 250 FILMS OF ALL-TIME.  These are movies that transcend a simple “My Favorite Scene” column.  These are movies that are hard to just pry five gems from, but we do and examine the film overall.  We’re on our eleventh installment in this series.  Click on the links for The Shawshank Redemption, The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, The Dark Knight, Pulp Fiction , Schindler’s List, 12 Angry Men, The Good The Bad and The Ugly, The Return of the King, and Fight Club to check out previous installments.

Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Having made it through the top 10, we come to #11 on the IMDB Top 250: the opening chapter in Peter Jackson’s flawless adaptation of The Lord of the Rings.  Taking Tolkien’s masterpiece from the province of literary scholars and the kids who sat alone at lunch in high school, Jackson showed the whole world the scope of Middle-Earth (to such extent that New Zealand, where both the LOTR and Hobbit films were shot, pretty much considers itself Middle-Earth).  The Lord of the Rings is my favorite film, and I treat it as one 12 hour epic, not three parts, but this works out to my advantage as all three chapters are in the top 15 and I get to showcase fifteen scenes instead of just five. Continue reading Top 5: Scenes from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (IMDB Top 250 #11)

Top 5: Scenes from Fight Club (IMDB Top 250 #10)

Brad Pitt, Edward Norton, Fight Club
Every month (or so) we take a look at a movie on the Internet Movie Database’s List of the TOP 250 FILMS OF ALL-TIME.  These are movies that transcend a simple “My Favorite Scene” column.  These are movies that are hard to just pry five gems from, but we do and examine the film overall.  We’re on our ninth installment in this series.  Click on the links for The Shawshank Redemption, The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, The Dark Knight, Pulp Fiction Schindler’s List, 12 Angry Men, The Good The Bad and The Ugly, and The Return of the King to check out previous installments.

Brad Pitt, Tyler Durden, Fight Club

“How much can you know about yourself if you’ve never really been in a fight?” Brad Pitt asks it of Edward Norton shortly after they meet, and people (particularly men) have been asking each other the question ever since David Fincher’s 1999 anarchic masterpiece was released.  Based on the equally (and oddly quite wise) novel by Chuck Palahniuk.  Fincher’s film is a unique and insightful look at the societal neutering of the American male.  I’m going to write this from the standpoint of one…since that’s what I happen to be.  Men are hard-wired for aggression.  We want to punch stuff.  We like to see things blow up, destroyed, and laid low.  We’re hunter-gatherers at our core.  Now we spend 40 hours a week in a sea of grey cubicles, and our weekends at Bed, Bath & Beyond.  There’s something missing.  We’re missing a key part of ourselves and it manifests in bottles of whiskey and Prozac.  We don’t know ourselves, because most of us haven’t been in a fight.  That’s why Fight Club (which didn’t do well in theaters) became a cult sensation.  It touched a nerve with men.  It was a revelation.
Continue reading Top 5: Scenes from Fight Club (IMDB Top 250 #10)

Top 5: Scenes from Lord of the Rings – The Return of the King (IMDB Top 250 #9)

Lord of the Rings, Return of the king, Lord of the Rings The Return of the King, Aragorn, Theoden, Eowyn, Gandalf, Arwen, LegolasEvery month we take a look at a movie on the Internet Movie Database’s List of the TOP 250 FILMS OF ALL-TIME.  These are movies that transcend a simple “My Favorite Scene” column.  These are movies that are hard to just pry five gems from, but we do and examine the film overall.  We’re on our ninth installment in this series.  Click on the links for The Shawshank Redemption, The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, The Dark Knight, Pulp Fiction Schindler’s List, 12 Angry Men, and The Good The Bad and The Ugly to check out previous installments.

7-the-lord-of-the-rings-the-return-of-the-king

With the release of the extended edition of Battle of the Five Armies, Peter Jackson’s six-film Middle Earth saga has come to a completion.  The end result, as a Tolkien die-hard, is a monument to the body of work the visionary fantasy writer created and some of the best films made in the last 25 years.  The Lord of the RIngs is really an 11 hour film broken into three parts, but all three are grouped fairly closely on the Top 250, so we’ll get to examine them all starting with the capper: The Return of the King.
Continue reading Top 5: Scenes from Lord of the Rings – The Return of the King (IMDB Top 250 #9)

Site Note: New Page on KT!

You’ll note there’s a new page on Killing Time if you take a look at the header bar.  With the 8th entry into our series examining the IMDB’s Top 250 movies, I thought it was time it got its own section.  As I mention on the page, I realize this list is a living document, which means the further down we go, the more likely it is to get altered by voting and the insertion of new films.  The rule we’re going to go by is we’ll keep marching down the list and new entries will have to stay on the list for a year before we readjust and go back for them (and I have to renumber everything).  Next up will be Lord of the Rings: Return of the King, one of my favorite films of all-time, so I’m looking forward to breaking it down and adding it to our growing list.  Just as an odd statistical note, the first two entries in this series are also the two most-viewed pieces I’ve done in the nearly three years I’ve run this site.

Top 5: Scenes from The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (IMDB Top 250 #8)

Clint Eastwood, The Good The Bad and The Ugly

Every month we take a look at a movie on the Internet Movie Database’s List of the the TOP 250 FILMS OF ALL-TIME.  These are movies that transcend a simple “My Favorite Scene” column.  These are movies that are hard to just pry five gems from, but we do and examine the film overall.  We’re on our eighth installment in this series.  Click on the links for The Shawshank Redemption, The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, The Dark Knight, Pulp Fiction Schindler’s List, and 12 Angry Men to check out previous installments.

It’s the film the term “Spaghetti Western” is most associated with and one of, if not the, most famous Western ever made.  It’s the final film in the “Dollars Trilogy” that Clint Eastwood and Sergio Leonne made, and Clint Eastwood’s iconic character “The Man With No Name” was named by Empire Magazine as one of the 50 Best Characters in Film History.  For all that, and as much as I respect it as a film, this isn’t one of my favorite movies.  The reason for that is that I’m a words person.  If Aaron Sorkin writes something where people are spewing paragraphs like they have guns to their heads and walking quickly through an office….I’m a happy guy.  In the first half-hour of The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, there may be a paragraph’s worth of words…..maybe.  It’s simply a style preference and you can’t deny it’s impact on the genre and the awesomeness of The Man with No Name as we’re a year shy of its 50th anniversary of release.  And Ennio Moriconne’s classic score IS the music for the Western genre and some of the most famous notes in film history.  Here are my favorite moments.

1. The Showdown

It’s the ultimate gunfight: simple as that. This is possibly the scene that makes Clint Eastwood the icon he always will be; the biggest Western star of all-time (sorry John Wayne, but it’s true).

2. Rescuing Tuco

I love the scam that Blondie and Tuco have going where he’s continually turning Tuco (and can we just pause to acknowledge one of the best supporting characters ever?) authorities to be hanged, then saving him at the last minute by shooting off the noose.

3. Our Partnership is Untied

No one is really “good” in this film, it’s just that Blondie comes the closest. Figuring that they’ve capped out on Tuco’s usefulness as a hanging dummy, Blondie drops him in the desert and we’re treated to a beautiful stream of Eli Wallach outraged insults.

4. Blue or Gray?

The setting for the film is shortly after the Civil War and this particular miscalculation in estimating sides is probably the funniest  moment in the film.  Stupid dust.

5. Tucco’s Final Insult

Here’s an occasion where Leonne’s style does work.  At the end of the film, balanced on a cross surrounded by gold, strung up once again, Tuco’s not sure if he’s going to be saved this time and the acting Wallach does in conveying the tension is just beautiful.

 

The Good The Bad and The Ugly, Clint Eastwood